Bud Matthews Services Blog : Archive for April, 2019

Reasons to Get Rid of the Old Window ACs

Monday, April 29th, 2019

old-window-unitCentral air conditioning systems started to become common for residential buildings in the 1970s. But many homes in the Durham area still rely on window units to provide their summer cooling. We recommend you have these window units replaced, either with a standard central air conditioning system (if you have ductwork in the house for it) or a ductless mini split system (a flexible option that makes it easy to transition away from window units).

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Seal Your Ducts This Spring for a Better Summer

Monday, April 15th, 2019

inside-air-ductIf you’re active about preparing your home for the summer, you’ve probably already schedule air conditioning maintenance. That’s great—there are few preventive home service jobs that are more effective than an annual inspection and tune-up for an AC. However, you might not have considered services for your ducts to prepare for the summer. Ducts are easy to forget about, since you can’t see most of them because their hidden in the walls at attics. But professional duct sealing may be the most important Chapel Hill, NC, HVAC service you can have done before the summer weather arrives.

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Is Your AC Losing Refrigerant? How to Tell

Monday, April 1st, 2019

air-conditioning-maintenance-technician-checks-mainfoldTo create lower temperatures indoors, your air conditioner uses the circulation of refrigerant, a chemical compound that can easily change between liquid and gaseous forms. As the refrigerant evaporates in the indoor coil of the AC, it absorbs heat and makes the air cooler. Then the refrigerant condenses in the outdoor coil, which releases the heat to the outside. This process is called heat exchange, moving heating from one place to another.

Without refrigerant, an air conditioner cannot carry out heat exchange, and that means no cooling. But that’s not the worst part! Without the proper amount of refrigerant, the entire AC is in danger of failing—usually permanently.

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